The Angelus

Volume 18, Number 37

Volume 18, Number 37

FROM THE RECTOR: FOOD AND DRINK

On Easter Day, April 18, 1965, the bulletin for the “High Mass,” as it was then called at Saint Mary’s, records the occasion when, for the first time, the Lord’s Prayer was sung by the congregation at the main service. Until that time, only the celebrant chanted it. Father Donald Garfield was the new rector. He had begun his ministry here on February 1, 1965. But an even more important change would come on Sunday, May 2, 1965: the congregation would be invited to receive communion at the 11:00 AM service. From the foundation of the parish until then, the main Sunday service was what was called a “noncommunicating High Mass”—at which only the celebrant received communion. Some will not know that the altar rail is removable and was removed for these Masses at which no one but the celebrant received communion.

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Volume 18, Number 36

 Volume 18, Number 36

FROM THE RECTOR: LORD’S PRAYER AND MORE

Last Sunday’s gospel included Luke’s version of the Lord’s Prayer—as it does every three years in the lectionary cycle. This year I had one additional resource in preparing my sermon: The Didache: A Commentary (1998) by Kurt Niederwimmer. “Didache” is a Greek word; it means “teaching.” The Didache is a text I learned about in seminary, “approximately the length of Paul’s Letter to the Galatians” (Niederwimmer, 1). It’s not a gospel, but a manual about the common life of the unnamed author’s community. Scholars now generally date this text to the 90s—contemporary with the Gospel According to John. (Matthew and Luke were probably written a decade earlier.) The Didache was known in the first centuries of the Christian era but last referenced in a text dated 829. Its rediscovery in 1883 was a major scholarly find.

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Volume 18, Number 35

Volume 18, Number 35

FROM THE RECTOR: REAL CHANGE

When I began attending the Leadership in Ministry workshops, one of the rites of passage, as it were, was to watch the 1995 movie Cold Comfort Farm. It’s hilarious, but it’s also very much a “family systems” story. I watched the 2015 movie Spotlight this week. It is not a comedy, but it is very much a family systems theory movie. I had forgotten it won the Academy Award for best picture in January. It is based on a familiar and all-too-real, tragic story.
 

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Volume 18, Number 34

Volume 18, Number 34

FROM THE RECTOR: GROUNDED UPON SCRIPTURE  

The Bible means more to me at this point in my life than I ever imagined it would, and a very great part of this has come from the many years now I have prayed Daily Morning and Evening Prayer. It took years for me to fall in love with the Acts of the Apostles, but fall I have—and I’m pretty close to a new and better relationship with the Book of Job. The journey with the Daily Office began, at the direction of my rector, when Bishop James Montgomery, IX Bishop of Chicago, accepted me as a postulant.

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Volume 18, Number 33

Volume 18, Number 33

FROM THE RECTOR: OPPORTUNITIES 

As I write on Friday morning, July 8, the news from Dallas, Texas, continues to come in. Sometime today—after this newsletter gets out—I expect to post on the parish webpage two very fine sermons preached by Father Peter Powell. I invite you to read both of them. In his sermon preached on June 19 he said, “The tragedy in Orlando points out for the umpteenth time that we compromise with evil to our peril.” Last Sunday he said, “We frequently act as if the only rational response to evil is to meet it head on and in kind. Is there another way?” I invite everyone to read these sermons.
 

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Volume 18, Number 32

Volume 18, Number 32

FROM THE RECTOR: SUMMER READING
 
A few weeks ago I picked up my copy of The Oxford Movement: Twelve Years: 1833–1845 by Richard William Church (1815–1890). The edition I have was published in paperback by the University of Chicago Press in 1970, and it was still selling when I got to graduate school there in the fall if 1976. I had been attending the Episcopal Church in college. I would soon become an Episcopalian at the local Episcopal parish in Kenwood and was active with the group at Brent House, the campus Episcopal chaplaincy.
 

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Volume 18, Number 31

Volume 18, Number 31

FROM THE MUSIC DIRECTOR:  NEW PLAINSONG

Near the front of The Hymnal 1982 is a section of 288 musical selections with numbers prefixed by the letter “S.” Most of us know that the letter “S” stands for “Service Music,” and the items so designated are thus differentiated from the 718 strophic hymns (and two national songs) that follow in the hymnal. “Service Music,” then, is music for singing the texts of the liturgy in the words of the Book of Common Prayer. The settings prefixed by the “S” include acclamations, versicles, canticles, and the songs common to the celebration of the Eucharist, namely the Kyrie, Gloria in excelsis, Trisagion, Creed, Sanctus and Benedictus, and Agnus Dei, etc. Among these musical settings are portions of a Rite II Mass Ordinary named “New Plainsong” by David Hurd. These have been sung for the past few weeks at Saint Mary’s. Here is a little background as to how these settings came to be.

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Volume 18, Number 30

Volume 18, Number 30

FROM FATHER SMITH: SEEING THE FACES, LEARNING THE NAMES

I am writing to you on Thursday morning, four days after the murders that took place at Pulse, a gay bar and dance club in Orlando. The discussion of these horrifying killings has now blossomed into a conversation about a large number of issues: terrorism, domestic and foreign; gun control; the role of powerful lobbies in our legislative processes; violence in American society; the causes of mass shootings in America; the role that religion plays, or has played, in promoting violence; the role that Islam plays, or does not play, in promoting violence and terrorism; the role that race and ethnicity may have played in the Orlando murders; Islamophobia; homophobia; and the life, background, religion, motivations, sexual orientation, and psyche of the murderer in Orlando.

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Volume 18, Number 29

Volume 18, Number 29

FROM THE RECTOR: HISTORICAL CRITICISM IN BIBLICAL STUDIES


The focus of the three-month sabbatical I took in the winter of 2009 was to relearn New Testament Greek. It was a good call for me at a good time. It reawakened my interest in New Testament studies. When I got home, the recommendations of Father Peter Powell led me to three commentaries that are really useful, Ulrich Luz on Matthew, Joel Marcus on Mark, and François Bovon on Luke. They all take, it turns out, what is called a "historical-critical" approach to Bible study.

Raymond Brown lists eleven different scholarly approaches in biblical studies in his 1997 book An Introduction to the New Testament(pages 20-28). Each approach has contributed to the field. Historical criticism is about, among other things, trying to understand, "what the author literally meant to say" (page 21). It turns out that the historical-critical approach itself is a matter of significant debate. Brown, himself a historical-critical scholar wrote, "Historical Criticism is concerned with the commonsense observation that readers of any book of Scripture will want to know what the author was trying to convey" (page 35). It is this approach, getting a sense, to the extent one can, of each evangelist's perspective that has helped me as a preacher.

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Volume 18, Number 28

Volume 18, Number 28

FROM THE RECTOR: ALICE VAIL MANNING, 1947–2016

Alice Manning died unexpectedly last Saturday morning at her home. She was only 68 years old. She had pulmonary disease, but it was not considered life-threatening. She had shared an apartment with her distant cousin Linda Bridges since Linda came to the city in 1970. They became close friends—in Linda’s words, “quasi-sisters.” Alice will be mourned and missed by many. Her funeral will be Monday, June 6, here at 10:00 AM. Her body has been cremated, and her ashes will be reposed in the Vault in the Lady Chapel at the conclusion of the service of the Burial of the Dead.

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VOLUME 18, Number 27

FROM THE RECTOR:  CORPUS CHRISTI

A few weeks ago, a recently ordained priest who had visited Saint Mary's wrote me to ask about continuing education in liturgy for someone who was just out of seminary and who had had almost no study of the subject while earning his master of divinity degree. I pointed him to the summer school program at Saint John's University, Collegeville. And I searched through my collection of articles on liturgy to find some things to send him that I thought would be helpful. One was an article by Paul Bradshaw, "The Eucharistic Sayings of Jesus" (Studia Liturgica 35 [2005], 1-11); another was a lecture Louis Weil gave in 2007, "When Signs Signify: The Baptismal Covenant in its Sacramental Context." As I began thinking about Corpus Christi this year, I took the time to re-read both of them.

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Volume 18, Number 26

Volume 18, Number 26

FROM THE RECTOR:  A LOT TO CELEBRATE

I have the great honor to announce that Dr. David J. Hurd has accepted the position of organist and music director of Saint Mary's. He's been with us as interim organist since April. On June 1, 2016, his name will be added to the list of distinguished persons who have served this congregation as the parish musician. David had already planned a special Te Deum for this Trinity Sunday-and part of my thanksgiving to God will be for the grace that has brought him here. He is an outstanding and accomplished organist, choral director,and composer.

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Volume 18, Number 25

FROM THE RECTOR: REDISCOVERING PENTECOST

Massey Shepherd in his commentary on the 1928 Prayer Book wrote, “Three Jewish observances were adopted by the Church from the very earliest days, and transformed and charged with new meaning” (Commentary on the American Prayer Book [1950], xlvi). These were the Sabbath, Passover, and Pentecost. The gathering on the Sabbath, Saturday, was the first adopted. Christians gathered in the evening weekly for a meal focused on Christ’s Second Coming. (Paul Bradshaw and Maxwell Johnson, Origins of Feasts, Fasts and Seasons in Early Christianity [2011], 13). By the end of the first century, Sundays are beginning gradually to replace Saturdays as the Christian Sabbath (Ibid., 7).

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Volume 18, Number 24

FROM THE RECTOR: COUNTDOWN
As I write on Friday morning after a glorious Ascension Day, I’m happy to report that the 72-inch Paschal Candle is going to make it through the Easter Season. I haven’t measured what’s left (not so much, but more than last year at this point), but the decision to go with the tallest available candle was a good one. In nine days it will be Pentecost. The candle will be extinguished that evening after Evensong and moved to the baptistry. It will return to the nave during the year when we gather to bury the dead, when we gather to proclaim the resurrection to eternal life of a sister or brother in Christ.

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Volume 18, Number 23

FROM THE RECTOR: ANOTHER GREAT WEEK

Sunday, May 1, is the Sixth Sunday of Easter. As is our custom, at the Solemn Mass on this first Sunday of what is traditionally the month of Mary, we will include the May Crowning devotions at the conclusion of the service. Following the Mass, the Annual Meeting of the congregation will be held in Saint Joseph’s Hall. Thursday, May 5, is Ascension Day, a principal feast of the church year. Our celebration will begin on Wednesday evening with Solemn Evensong for the Eve of Ascension Day. On Thursday, the Right Reverend R. William Franklin, bishop of Western New York, will be celebrant for the Solemn Mass at 6:00 PM. It will be great to welcome him back to the parish. In addition to our evening Solemn Mass, there will be a Sung Mass here at 12:10 PM.

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Volume 18, Number 22

FROM THE RECTOR: CHANGE ORDER NUMBER 1
 
 Work on the new rectory roof has begun. Since December, with short breaks at Christmastide and during Holy Week and Easter Week, I have been part of a weekly meeting with our architects, Jan Hird Pokorny, Associates, and with our contractor, West New York Restoration. I’ve been learning a lot. I’ve been very impressed by the knowledge, skills, and commitment to a historically significant building they are bringing to us. It’s a meeting I look forward to attending very much.

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Volume 18, Number 21

FROM THE RECTOR: EUCHARISTIC SHEPHERD
 
 The Catechesis of the Good Shepherd (CGS) has played an important role in my spiritual life and my work as a priest since I first encountered it at Saint James’ Cathedral, South Bend, Indiana, in the winter of 1989. CGS is a Montessori approach to religious formation for children ages three to twelve. Though Roman Catholic in origin, it has been adapted by other denominations, including our own. This ecumenical approach was encouraged by its founding leaders, the late Hebrew scholar Sofia Cavalletti (1917–2011) and her Montessori colleague Gianna Gobbi (1919–2002). Cavalletti and Gobbi believed that God was at work in every child’s life. This catechesis provides an environment for every child to work on the relationship with God he or she already had in his or her life.

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VOLUME 18, NUMBER 20

FROM THE RECTOR:  OPEN DOORS PHASE 1

On Trinity Sunday, May 22, following the Solemn Mass, we will celebrate the end of Phase 1 of “Open Doors: The Campaign for the Church of Saint Mary the Virgin.” When the feasibility study was conducted in the spring of 2015 by the Episcopal Church Foundation. They recommended that we set a goal of $1,718,000. To date we have received pledges that total $2,682,859 and unsolicited donations of $19,420 for a campaign total to date of $2,702,279. Thank you, God. Congratulations, Saint Mary’s.

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Volume 18, Number 19

FROM THE RECTOR: REJOICE
 
I was up before dawn on Easter Day, to go the tomb, as it were—actually to work on my sermon—which couldn’t help but remind me of the women in the resurrection stories in the gospels; and like those holy women, I discovered something I did not expect to find. In Matthew, on the morning of the resurrection as Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of James and Joseph are going from the tomb to tell the disciples what they have seen and what they have been told by the angel to tell the others, Jesus greets them with the command, “Rejoice” (Matthew 28:9a). In his book Matthew 21–28: A Commentary (2005), Professor Ulrich Luz writes, “With this greeting he confirms and deepens the ‘great joy’ the women already have [received] (v.8)” (page 607).

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Volume 18, Number 18

FROM THE RECTOR: EASTER DAY AT SAINT MARY’S
 
As I write before sunrise on Good Friday, the church is dark and bare. There’s only enough light in the church so those who have been coming in during the night can move about safely. The candles are burning in the Mercy Chapel, where the Sacrament was reposed at the close of the Eucharist last night. But in a real sense, we have been celebrating the Lord’s resurrection all week.

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