The Angelus

VOLUME 21, NUMBER 8

VOLUME 21, NUMBER 8

FROM THE RECTOR: JANUARY TRANSITIONS

 

Just as Saint Mary’s is very special place for our congregation and the parish’s many friends. It is also a special place for our associated clergy and their families. If Saint Mary’s becomes one’s spiritual home, it hard to leave and hard to say good-bye. Deacon Rebecca Weiner Tompkins has lived in Nashville, Tennessee, for over a year now. When she first made this move, she and I hoped it would be a temporary one. Though she still hopes to return to the city, it is time to acknowledge this transition has taken place. Just as a bishop can’t be bishop of a diocese in which he or she is not resident, a rector can’t be rector of a parish where he or she doesn’t live, a deacon cannot be a deacon where he or she does not live. We’re going to miss her very much. I look forward to planning a time with her in the spring to celebrate her work here.

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VOLUME 21, NUMBER 7

VOLUME 21, NUMBER 7

“Whenever you did one of these things to someone overlooked or ignored, that was me—you did it to me”

(Matthew 25:40, The Message translation)

 

The people of Saint Mary’s have long recognized that, in the words of Frank Weston (1871–1924), Bishop of Zanzibar (1908–24), “You cannot claim to worship Jesus in the Tabernacle, if you do not pity Jesus in the slum.” Weston’s words came in the context of an address to a conference of the budding Anglo-Catholic movement. He rightly made the connection that Anglo-Catholic faith flowed naturally from the presence of Christ in the Sacrament to the presence of Christ in all people, especially those most needing our help. This parish continues in that tradition and commitment in opening our doors to all, and to striving in our corner of the world to clothe and care for those “overlooked and ignored” by providing clothing, hygiene items, and other services, free of charge to those who need them.

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VOLUME 21, NUMBER 6

VOLUME 21, NUMBER 6

The Feast of the Epiphany, January 6, falls on Sunday this year. It is one of the principal feasts of the church year. Our celebration begins with Evening Prayer and the Sunday Vigil Mass on Saturday evening and continues with the regular schedule of Sunday services. Monday, January 7, will be the beginning of the Epiphany Season. Lent begins on Wednesday, March 6, 2019.

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VOLUME 21, NUMBER 5

VOLUME 21, NUMBER 5

FROM THE RECTOR: THE OTHER CHRISTMAS STORY

There are two gospels that have stories of the annunciation and birth of Jesus. The birth story from Luke is read on Christmas Eve. The one from Matthew (1:18–25) is never read on a Sunday in the Christmas Season in the Episcopal Church. It’s only appointed for the Fourth Sunday of Advent in Year A of the three-year lectionary cycle. The Revised Common Lectionary adopted by the church in 2006 did not address this—one wonders if anyone even raised the issue. In 2012, the General Convention gave the bishop of the diocese authority to permit congregations to use the 1979 lectionary—and if memory serves, Bishop Mark Sisk gave us that permission before General Convention ended.

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VOLUME 21, NUMBER 4

VOLUME 21, NUMBER 4

FROM THE RECTOR: MERRY CHRISTMAS

Christmas greens were delivered last Monday, and the Flower Guild has been hard at work ever since. After the greens were unpacked, to walk through Saint Joseph’s Hall was very much like walking through a kind of maze—I suspect it will be like that again once the flowers are delivered. A huge amount of work remains to be done. On December 23, morning and evening, it will be the Fourth Sunday of Advent, but by then signs of our celebration of Christ’s birth will be in view in some places in the church. I think I speak for many of the parish’s members and friends when I say that I am immensely grateful for the creativity, talent, and commitment of the members of the Flower Guild, and of those who help them at this time of year. The Guild’s work seems to be a labor of love, but the many hours spent are also a generous gift that helps us all to worship in a greater beauty of holiness at Christmas.

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VOLUME 21, NUMBER 3

VOLUME 21, NUMBER 3

FROM THE RECTOR: DARKNESS AND LIGHT

 

Since our church is surrounded by very tall buildings, only a little sunlight ever shines through the windows. The transition to Standard Time in the fall is always an abrupt one. Although there’s a gradual transition to cooler weather, there’s no gradual transition to the darkness of winter. On the first Sunday of Standard Time, it’s just darker in the church for evening services—my reaction is always to think that some of the lights aren’t turned on.

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VOLUME 21, NUMBER 2

VOLUME 21, NUMBER 2

FROM THE RECTOR: 2019 PARISH CALENDARS

The 2019 Parish Calendar will arrive this week. This is the second year we have published our own calendar. The 1979 Prayer Book’s “The Calendar of the Church Year” (pages 19–30) has undergone revision by every triennial meeting of the General Convention since it was adopted except in 1982. When the 2018 General Convention declined to authorize Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, the calendar adopted in 2006 remains the current standard.

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VOLUME 21, NUMBER 1

VOLUME 21, NUMBER 1

FROM THE RECTOR: NEWS FOR A NEW YEAR

 

Number One: Three bids were received this past week for the restoration of the West 46th Street façade of the church. At last. I am hopeful that the board of trustees will be able to approve a contract at its December 10 meeting. The bylaws of the parish’s board are flexible about the dates and the frequency of meetings, with one exception: the board must meet within eight days of the patronal feast, December 8, the Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. I hope there will be more good news for us before Christmas.

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 52

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 52

FROM THE RECTOR: THE LAST SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

 When the 1979 Prayer Book was being prepared, the Standing Liturgical Commission made a deliberate choice to avoid the title “Christ the King” for the last Sunday of the church year. For us, it was simply “The Last Sunday after Pentecost.” There was a good reason for that. This commemoration was instituted by Pope Pius XI for the Roman Catholic Church on December 11, 1925, in his encyclical, known by its Latin title, Quas primasthe link will take you to the official English translation. Originally appointed to be celebrated on the last Sunday of October, in the 1969 reform of the Roman Catholic liturgy the commemoration was moved to the last Sunday of the liturgical year.

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 51

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 51

FROM THE RECTOR: A GOD WHO SEEKS

As I write on Thursday afternoon, I recall the second lesson, which I read today at Morning Prayer. It was the lesson known by most of us as the Parable of the Prodigal Son, Luke 15:11–32. I think it was in one of the training courses for the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd that I heard it called the Parable of the Forgiving Father. This morning a phrase caught my attention as I was reading—I’m pretty sure for the first time.

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 50

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 50

FROM THE RECTOR: VETERANS DAY 2018

This Sunday is the centennial of the armistice that ended the fighting in Europe during World War I. As the twentieth century began, very few foresaw the many wars that would be fought in the decades to come—or that political revolutions would take far more lives than all of the wars that were fought.

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 49

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 49

FROM THE RECTOR: YEAR’S END APPROACHING

When I was in seminary, there was a table in the library where one could pick up books that had been donated to the library, but had not been added, for one reason or another, to the collection. Among the books I picked up in the fall of 1980—I wrote my name and the date in it—was Prayer Book Studies 19: The Church Year: The Calendar and the Proper of the Sundays and Other Holy Days Throughout the Church Year (1970). However, it would be many years before I had enough learned enough and gained enough experience to appreciate that book.

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 48

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 48

FROM DEACON REBECCA WEINER TOMPKINS: ORDINARY TIME

We have one more month of the season after Pentecost, Ordinary Time, the green season. When it began in spring, everything seemed to have sprung from the earth—greener than ever before. I was traveling between New York City and Nashville then, dealing with death but also life: the recent passing of my mother and the marriage of my daughter and, as usual for all of us at times, the trials of friends and loved ones, of sickness, sorrow, and struggles, those details of ordinary life that don’t always feel very ordinary.

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 47

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 47

FROM BROTHER DAMIEN JOSEPH, SSF: PEACE AND ALL GOOD

The Umbrian town of Assisi is, not surprisingly, Franciscan Central. Habited Franciscans swarm about like ants, and, as they pass one another, they often say, almost automatically, “Pace e bene!”  It’s like the religious equivalent of Jeep owners nodding knowingly as they pass on the road: “It’s a friar thing, you wouldn’t understand.”

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 46

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 46

FROM THE RECTOR: 2019 PARISH CALENDAR

Sister Monica Clare, C.S.J.B., began work on the 2019 parish calendar in the early summer. She also gave me another set of lessons on how to use Adobe Photoshop, which meant that I can work with the templates she had prepared for each month. In the meantime, I prepared drafts of the monthly clergy calendar and the monthly calendar of all services for all of 2019. The templates and the schedules require accuracy, since many of us use the calendar to organize our everyday lives here at the parish. What continues to be challenging is thinking through why and when we are to commemorate what our Episcopal Church calls “the lesser feasts.”

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 45

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 45

FROM THE RECTOR: OCTOBER BEGINS

This is an unusual issue of The Angelus as it is being completed on Monday, October 8, 2018. Pastoral work is the priority of your parish priests. And it was pastoral work and our hosting of a special conference that has caused the delay in publishing our weekly newsletter. (This issue is dated October 7, and some of the information herein, including the music discussed in Dr. Hurd's note, concerns events already past. The next issue of the newsletter, we hope, will be published on Friday, October 12, as usual).

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 44

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 44

FROM BROTHER DAMIEN JOSEPH, SSF: Blessed Francistide!

The Brothers of the Society of Saint Francis are thrilled to be joining the Saint Mary's community. We are joining you at a significant time of the year for Franciscans. The term "Francistide," is used loosely to describe the period surrounding the Feast of Saint Francis of Assisi. Properly, Francistide only refers to the time from the feast until the following Sunday. It is a time of important reflection and celebration for us as Franciscan brothers.

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 43

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 43

FROM THE RECTOR: PATRIMONY

Over the time I have served at Saint Mary's, I have learned more than I ever imagined I would need to learn about the maintenance and conservation of our building and its furnishings. Because of the age of our building and its landmark status, more and more work will need to be done by skilled artisans under the direction of architects and engineers who have experience with buildings like ours. Fortunately, we are in a great city where people with such training and experience are to be found.

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 42

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 42

FROM FATHER SMITH: LIFELONG LEARNING

When I was growing up I sometimes heard certain folks described as "eternal students." The epithet was never meant as a compliment. I was never sure why. After all, what's wrong with curiosity or a desire to learn? These days the catch phrase, at least in some educational circles, is "lifelong learning." I like that one better. At the risk of sounding Rumsfeldian, I would argue that we don't always know what we don't know. But when we figure that out--at 25, or 35, or 85--we are sometimes still eager to fill in the gaps. We decide to do something about what we don't know. We decide to study, and there's nothing wrong with that.

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VOLUME 20, NUMBER 41

VOLUME 20, NUMBER 41

FROM THE RECTOR: 9/11 AND 9/14

As in the year 2001, this year September 11 is a Tuesday and September 14, Holy Cross Day, is a Friday. On Tuesday the 12:10 PM Mass will be offered as a requiem for those who were killed in the terrorist attacks that day. On Holy Cross Day, a "Feast of Our Lord Jesus Christ," in addition to the Daily 12:10 Eucharist there will be a Sung Mass at 6:00 PM. (Friday abstinence is not observed on "Feasts of Our Lord Jesus Christ.") For those who are new to Saint Mary's, our "Evening Sung Masses" start at 6:00 PM and finish before 7:00 PM. There's some music, and incense is offered; but it's a Sung Mass, not a Solemn Mass-less chanting, less ceremony. And it seems right for the day.

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